Works Cited

A Chinese Slave Girl. 1900. Photograph. San Francisco. Chinatown San Francisco circa 1900. Web. http://www.flickr.com/photos/28649395@N06/2739248018/.

Baym, Nina. Woman’s Fiction: A Guide to Novels by and about Women in America, 1820-1870. Ithaca&London: Cornell UP, 1978. Print.

Campbell, Donna M. “Literary Movements.” Domestic Fiction, 1830-1860. Washington State University. Web. http://public.wsu.edu/~campbelld/amlit/domestic.htm.

Campbell, Donna M. “Literary Movements.” Slave Narratives. Washington State University. Web. http://public.wsu.edu/~campbelld/amlit/slave.htm

Chinese Girl With Bound Feet. Photograph. The Virtual Museum of the City of San Francisco, San Francisco. Chinese Girl With Bound Feet. The Virtual Museum of the City of San Francisco. Web. http://www.sfmuseum.org/chin/foot.html.

Chinese Prostitute. Photograph. Shanghailist. Web. http://shanghaiist.com/2006/04/10/thats_one_smart.php.

Chinese- The Gold Rushes. Photograph. Australia. Gold Rush. Asian Education Foundation. Web. http://asiaeducationfoundation.wikispaces.com/Chinese+in+Australia+(Gold+Rush).

Donaldina Cameron. Photograph. A Chinese American Historian by Chance, San Francisco. Web. http://chineseamericanhistorian.blogspot.com/2012/04/ching-ming-remembrance-in-los-angeles.html.

Donaldina Cameron during a Rescue Mission. Photograph. Cameron House, San Francisco. Cameron House: History. Cameron House. Web. http://www.cameronhouse.org/aboutus/history.html.

Holder, Charles F. “Chinese Slavery In America.” The North American Review 165.490 (1897): 288-94. JSTOR. Web. http://www.jstor.org/stable/25118876.

In the House of the Tiger. Photograph. Making of America Archive, San Francisco. In the House of the Tiger. Making of America Archive. Web. http://quod.lib.umich.edu/m/moa/agw6821.0001.001/1?g=moagrp;page=root;rgn=full+text;size=100;view=image;xc=1;q1=In+the+House+of+the+Tiger.

Jabloner, Paula, and Leilani Marshall. Jessie Juliet Knox Collection. Online Archive of California, Dec. 2001. Web. http://www.oac.cdlib.org/findaid/ark:/13030/kt7r29q3h7/entire_text/.

Jessie Juliet Knox In Chinese Costume. Photograph. Making of America, San Francisco. In the House of the Tiger. Making of America. Web. http://quod.lib.umich.edu/m/moa/agw6821.0001.001/4?g=moagrp;page=root;rgn=full+text;size=100;view=image;xc=1;q1=In+the+House+of+the+Tiger.

Knox, Jessie J. In The House of the Tiger. New York& Cincinnati: Library of the University of Michigan, 1911. Making of America Archive. University of Michigan & Cornell University. Web. http://quod.lib.umich.edu/m/moa/agw6821.0001.001/1?xc=1&g=moagrp&q1=in+the+house+of+the+tiger&view=image&size=100.

Lowance, Mason. Against Slavery: An Abolitionist Reader. New York: Penguin, 2000. Print.

Norton, Henry K. “The Chinese.” Gold Rush and Anti- Chinese Race Hatred. The Virtual Museum of the City of San Francisco. Web. http://www.sfmuseum.org/hist6/chinhate.html.

Pacific Chivalry. 1869. Photograph. Martial History Magazine, San Francisco. Chinese-American Boxers Before 1900. Martial Magazine History. Web. http://martialhistory.com/2007/06/chinese-american-boxers-before-1900/.

Pascoe, Peggy. Relations of Rescue: The Search for Female Authority in the American West, 1874-1939. New York & Oxford: Oxford UP, 1990. Print.

Thomas, Vicki. “Donaldina Cameron: Missionary, Social Worker, and Youth Advocate.” Encyclopedia of San Francisco. San Francisco Museum and Historical Society. Web. http://www.sfhistoryencyclopedia.com/articles/c/cameronDonaldina.html.

Unemployed Chinese Men in San Francisco’s Chinatown District around the Year 1900, When the City Had the Largest Concentration of Chinese Immigrants in North America. 1900. Photograph. Library of Congress, San Francisco. Ethnic Enclaves. Encyclopedia of Immigration. Web. http://immigration-online.org/484-ethnic-enclaves.html.

White and Chinese Miners Hoping to Strike It Rich during the California Gold Rush at Auburn Ravine in 1852. 1852. Photograph. Archives of the West, San Francisco. New Perspectives on the West. PBS. Web. http://www.pbs.org/weta/thewest/resources/archives/three/63_02.htm.

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